Removal – Day 1

October 6, 1846 Peru, Indiana Content Warning: This post discusses specific names of Myaamia people impacted by Removal. It is possible that you may have a personal connection with some of those individuals. “The first emigrating party of Miamis was started from Iihkipihsinonki ‘Peru, Indiana’ on the 6th October 1846.” So began the “Report of…

Loading the Boats

Content Warning: This post discusses the military presence used to bring Myaamia people to Peru, IN. In the previous blog post, we saw that during the first days of October 1846, Removal contractor Alexis Coquillard and his hired men were capturing Myaamiaki ‘Miami people’ from their homes and taking them to a holding camp in…

Forced From Our Homes

Content Warning: This post discusses specific names of Myaamia people impacted by Removal. It is possible that you may have a personal connection with some of those individuals. In the previous blog post, we saw that our efforts to delay Removal frustrated the Removal contractors, leading them to threaten us with military force. By the…

A Small Military Force, 1846

This audio file is a reading of the post that follows. In the previous blog post, we examined the efforts of the Miami National Council to delay Removal of Myaamiaki to west of the Mihsi-Siipiiwi ‘Mississippi River.’ We also saw that the United States government and the Removal contractors were increasingly frustrated with the delays…

Delaying Removal 1840 to 1846

This audio file is a reading of the post that follows. In past blog posts, we have examined the Treaty of 1840, which called for Myaamiaki to be removed west of the Mihsi-Siipiiwi ‘Mississippi River.’ We have discussed the background for the Miami National Council agreeing to Removal and the reasons they agreed that some…

Exemptions from Removal

This audio file is a reading of the post that follows. In previous blog posts, we have examined the events leading up to the 1840 Myaamia Removal treaty and the circumstances that led the Miami National Council to agree to Removal. We also noted that the 1838 and 1840 treaties provided for three families to…

Why did the Miami National Council agree to Removal?

This audio file is a reading of the post that follows. In previous blog posts, we have seen that the Miami National Council, led by Pinšiwa ‘J.B. Richardville,’ was adamantly opposed to Removal, even as they saw other tribes being forced west of the Mihsi-Siipiiwi ‘Mississippi River.’ Their stance on the inevitability of Removal began…

šimaakanehsia aniimaakanemi ‘Soldier’s Flag’

In 1887, Myaamia elder Kiilhsoohkwa sat in a courtroom in Tahkinkamionki ‘Wabash, Indiana’ holding a blue, white, and red striped flag in her lap. In the flag’s upper left corner sat a small white field inscribed with the words “A. Wayne Commander in Chief.” As Kiilhsoohkwa held the flag, she reportedly exclaimed in the Myaamia…

Removal – the Treaty of 1840

This audio file is a reading of the post that follows. In the previous entry, we saw that in the Treaty of 1838, Myaamia leaders agreed for the first time to consider a future Removal west. As we look at the Treaty of 1840, we will see how that agreement to consider became an agreement…

Four Versions of a Little Turtle Speech at Greenville, 1795

Four Versions of a Little Turtle Speech at Greenville, 1795 *and a conversation about them The following four primary sources all reveal aspects of a critical message delivered by the Myaamia leader Mihšihkinaahkwa ‘Little Turtle’ during the summer of 1795 at negotiations in Greenville in the Ohio territory. For the context, see our previous two…