How did Myaamia (Miami Indian) people govern themselves? (FAQ)

Individual independence was highly valued in Myaamia village communities and examples abound of leaders informing Europeans that they could “order” nothing and that in fact the more they gave orders the more they diminished their status.  In 1721, Father Pierre Francois Xavier de Charlevoix stated: “These chiefs generally have no great marks of outward respect…

Did the Myaamia (Miami Indians) have sub-tribes? (FAQ)

Many histories apply the label “sub-tribe” to groups like the Atchakangouen, Kilatika, Mengkonkia, Pepikokia, Piankeshaw, and Wea.  Each of these names are, for the most part, Miami-Illinois speaking village groups.  Each of these villages operated as its own largely independent community. They all shared the same language; stories; ecological patterns and behaviors (culture); and the…

Walking a Myaamia Trail

myaamiihkanawe peempaalinki – Walking a Myaamia Trail In the post “Walking Myaamionki” we explored how Myaamia people first settled the Waapaahšiki Siipiiwi (Wabash River).  That post left off with the question: what held all these unique villages, spread over hundreds of miles, together as a group?  Prior to contact with Europeans, each village had their…

What does the word “Miami” mean? (FAQ)

The word Miami is related to the word Myaamia (click the word to go to the online dictionary and hear it pronounced).  Myaamia means “downstream person” though we often translate it into the plural “people.” In the distant past, this was a term that other indigenous peoples applied to us, but over time we began…