cecaahkwa kiilhswa (Sandhill Crane Moon)

cecaahkwa kiilhswa is the third lunar month of the Myaamia lunar calendar.  Like the other months named for birds, cecaahkwa kiilhswa is associated with the process of transition from pipoonwi (winter) into niipinwi (summer).  The month is named for cecaahkwa (Sandhill Crane – grus canadensis). Around this time of year, Sandhill Cranes return from their…

niikinaana – Our Homes (FAQ)

Over time, Myaamia people have lived in a wide variety dwelling types. The traditional home of the Myaamia is called wiikiaami.  A wiikiaami is a domed structure that could be covered in cattail reed mats or bark depending on the season. Often these were also lined with bulrush mats, which were decorated. The layers of mats…

Mihšiiwia Kiilhswa (Elk Moon)

Mihšiiwia Kiilhswa (Elk Moon) is named for the Eastern American Elk (Cervus canadensis canadensis). In the 1400s, it is estimated that the Eastern Elk had the greatest range of any hoofed species in North America. But this dispersed and large population diminished quickly in the years following European settlement. By the 1840s, no Eastern Elk subspecies…

cecaahkwa kiilhswa (Sandhill Crane Moon)

cecaahkwa kiilhswa is the third lunar month of the Myaamia lunar calendar.  Like the other months named for birds, cecaahkwa kiilhswa is associated with the process of transition from pipoonwi (winter) into niipinwi (summer).  The month is named for cecaahkwa (Sandhill Crane – grus canadensis). Around this time of year, Sandhill Cranes return from their…

Mihšiiwia Kiilhswa (Elk Moon)

Mihšiiwia Kiilhswa (Elk Moon) is named for the Eastern American Elk (Cervus canadensis canadensis).  The Eastern Elk subspecies was hunted out in the state of Indiana by the 1840s and declared extinct in North America in 1880. To the best of our knowledge, this month is associated with the fact that the Eastern Elk used…

Aancihtoonki Kiihkihsenki

A Mended Picture On the first page of this year’s lunar calendar (link here), you may have noticed the picture titled “aancihtoonki kiihkihsenki” (pictured above).  In the lower right corner is the original version of this photo showing numerous serious cracks and other damage.  The larger photo is the result of the hard work of…