9 kiišiinkwia kiilhswa (2021)

noonki kaahkiihkwe ceeliteeki (82℉) tikawi aalahkwahki ahsenisiipionki. noonki peehkonteeki kiinte napale waawiyiisita kiišiinkwia kiilhswa (keešaakosita). taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha apiyani? neemani-nko kati kiišiinkwia kiilhswa? tookinanto oowaaha -> kiišiinkwia kiilhswa neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši. (For English, click below)

Miincipahkinki ‘In the Cornfield’

Planting and caring for miincipi ‘corn’ is a generations old summertime activity for Myaamiaki. This is reflected in our lunar calendar system, which has one month named for a stage of the growth miincipi and strong ecological connections to three other months (see the image caption below for more details on miincipi’s connection to the…

taaniši kiišikahki ‘How’s the Weather?’

Each summer during our Eewansaapita camps, we encourage participants to work with their group to present a weather report to their peers. Much like the weather reports we post on Aacimotaatiiyankwi, participants pair images with Myaamia language to describe what they’re experiencing. Want to try it yourself? All you need is access to a window…

pahsaahkaahkanka ‘Summer Solstice’

This summer, Eemamwiciki Summer Program participants are exploring ašiihkiwi neehi kiišikwi ‘Earth and Sky.’ One sky event easy to observe is pahsaahkaahkanka ‘summer solstice.’ This term refers to splitting the sky since the Sun appears directly overhead in our homelands. It also marks the longest day of the year. Pahsaahkaahkanka always occurs during Paaphsaahka Niipinwiki…

ciinkwia waahpyaaci ‘Thunder has Arrived’

ciinkwia awiiwahi neehineeciki neehi-hsa ciinkwia noontaakweeci ‘The spring peepers have been singing and thunder has sounded.’ It’s happened at different times over the last three weeks, but we can say with certainty that following the first thunderstorm of the year, peepoonki ‘winter’ has come to an end and neepinwiki ‘summer’ has begun. For many Myaamiaki…