16 kiiyolia kiilhswa (2019)

October 16, 2019

noonki kaahkiihkwe naanoohkite neepanki (47) aalahkwahki ahsenisiipionki.

noonki peehkonteeki kiinte waawiyiisita kiiyolia kiilhswa (peemineeta).

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha eepiyani?

neemani-nko kati kiiyolia kiilhswa? tookinanto oowaaha -> kiiyolia kiilhswa

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.

(For English, click below)

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We Remember the Myaamia Forced Removal

aya eeweemilakakoki ‘Hello my relatives,’ 173 years ago this week, the United States government began the forced removal of Myaamia people from our historic homelands in the Wabash River Valley. On October 6, 1846, Myaamia people boarded canal boats near Iihkipihsinonki ‘the Straight Place’ (Peru, Indiana) and on the next day loading concluded near Kiihkayonki ‘Fort Wayne, Indiana.’ All told, in just over a month of forced travel, over 320 Myaamia people were moved via canals and rivers to Kanza Landing (Kansas City, Missouri) in the Unorganized Indian Territory. At least seven Myaamia people died on the journey and many more died over the following winter. Two babies were also born on the nearly month-long journey. This forced removal fragmented the Miami Nation, as five family leaders retained the right to receive their treaty annuities in Indiana and thereby remained behind on individual or family reserves in the state.

As we sit together under the half full moon of kiiyolia kiilhswa and celebrate the fall harvest, we should all take a moment and reflect on this very difficult journey and remember the Myaamia people who suffered being separated from their homes and their families in the fall of 1846. It is through their struggles that the Miami Nation endured on a new national land base west of the Mihsi-siipiiwi (Mississippi River). If you would like to read more about Myaamia Aancihseeciki (the Myaamia Forced Removal), follow this link to download “A Cultural Exploration of the Myaamia Removal Route.”

By Isaac Stephani and Cam Shriver

Note: This blog post stems from original research conducted by undergraduate student Isaac Stephani in Dr. Cam Shriver’s Intro to the Miami Tribe class at Miami University in spring 2019.

In late September of 1817, the Treaty of Fort Meigs, also known as the Treaty of Maumee Rapids, was signed. In it, six Native nations collectively ceded over 4.5 million acres of territory to the United States. Representing the United States was Governor of the Michigan territory Lewis Cass, and Ohio legislator Duncan McArthur, while numerous leaders represented the six Native tribes present: ​Wyandot​s, ​Senecas, Delawares, Shawnees, Potawatomis, Ottawas, and Ojibwes. Marking one of the largest cessions of land by Native peoples since the Treaty of Greenville in 1795, the Treaty of Fort Meigs was part of a larger effort to move Native people Westward of the Mississippi River, as was Lewis Cass’ objective over the course of his nearly three decades as Governor of the Michigan territory.[1] Secretary of War George Graham, who oversaw the U.S. Indian Department, congratulated Cass on his negotiation at Fort Meigs, writing that the “extent of cession far exceed[s] my most sanguine expectations.”[2] But despite the treaty’s cession of land that the Miami leader Mihšihkinaahkwa ‘Little Turtle’ had claimed as belonging to the Miami nation, no Myaamia leaders signed it. Where were the Myaamia at the 1817 Treaty of Fort Meigs? Until now, we have had little evidence to explain Myaamia feelings at the time; there are still questions to answer. But the lack of Myaamia participation at Fort Meigs contextualizes the Treaty of St. Mary’s, signed by Myaamia leaders just over a year later on October 6, 1818, which ceded a huge area of Miami country. It also puts into clearer focus the pressures on Native American nations to yield swaths of their heritage homelands. Read the rest of this entry »

1 kiiyolia kiilhswa (2019)

October 1, 2019

noonki kaahkiihkwe peehki ceeliteeki (94) tikawi aalahkwahki ahsenisiipionki.

noonki peehkonteeki saakiwa kiiyolia kiilhswa (keešaakosita).

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha eepiyani?

neemani-nko kati kiiyolia kiilhswa? tookinanto oowaaha -> kiiyolia kiilhswa

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.

(For English, click below)

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noonki kaahkiihkwe tikawi ceeliteeki (80) tikawi aalahkwahki ahsenisiipionki. kiinte eetihteeki pyaakimini.

noonki peehkonteeki naawi myaalisiwa šaašaakayolia kiilhswa (peemineeta).

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha eepiyani?

neemani-nko kati šaašaakayolia kiilhswa? tookinanto oowaaha -> šaašaakayolia kiilhswa

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.

(For English, click below)

Read the rest of this entry »