Benefits of Storytelling: Take-Aways from my Dissertation

As some of you know, I completed my doctoral degree at Iowa State University in 2019. As part of the process, I had to write a dissertation, a long and arduous manuscript summarizing findings from an independent research study. I wrote mine about the impact of Myaamia storytelling on living well for Myaamiaki.  I interviewed…

Myaamia Heritage Program Update – January 2022

The students in the Myaamia Heritage Program finished out their fall semester strong.  This year in the Myaamia Heritage Course, students are learning about Myaamia ecological perspectives and history.  We spent the majority of the year outside, exploring the ideas of how to view our environment through a Myaamia lens.  This included tree walks on…

Removal to Indian Territory

In the December 3 blog post, we learned about the 1847 second forced Removal of Myaamiaki from Indiana and the subsequent movements of Myaamia people between Indiana and the Miami Reservation in present-day Kansas. In the November 5 post, we saw that the winter of 1846-1847 was very hard for Myaamiaki, and many died. Still,…

Continued Movement between Indiana and the Miami Reservation

Content Warning: This post discusses specific names of Myaamia families impacted by Removal. It is possible that you may have a personal connection with some of those families. In the November 5 blog post, we saw that Myaamiaki had arrived at the Miami Reservation in what is today eastern Kansas “about one mile west of…

Baking with Pyaakimina ‘Persimmon Berries’

Written by Kayla Becker This year, the Myaamia Heritage Class is focusing on ecological perspectives, or the way we view the land around us. My two favorite ways to spend my free time are hiking outdoors and baking in the kitchen, so I was extremely excited. I was eager to learn more about the plants…

Removal – Day 31

November 5, 1846 Arrival at the Miami Reservation Content Warning: This post discusses the conditions upon arrival at the Miami Reservation and death of Myaamiaki on the journey. In the November 4 blog post, we saw that some Myaamiaki had arrived at the Miami Reservation on Sugar Creek in the Osage River Sub-Agency. Upon arrival,…

Removal – Day 30

November 4, 1846 Sugar Creek Today some Myaamiaki completed the 50-mile journey from the Town of Kansas to the Miami Reservation on Sugar Creek in the Osage River Sub-Agency, one mile west of the military road they had traveled. In the next installment, to be posted on November 5, we will see what these Myaamiaki…

Removal – Day 29

November 3, 1846 The Overland Journey Content Warning: This post discusses the death of Myaamiaki. Myaamiaki continued their journey by horse and wagon toward their new reservation. Today a 16-year-old boy died, bringing the total deaths on this Removal journal to seven. As Myaamiaki traveled south on the military road, they passed the reservations of…

Removal – Day 28

November 2,1846 Beginning the Overland Journey Both Toohpia ‘Francis LaFontaine’ and Removal Agent Joseph Sinclair wrote that this morning Myaamiaki left the Town of Kansas, present-day Kansas City, Missouri, for the new Miami Reservation in what is today eastern Kansas. Even before leaving the Town of Kansas, Toohpia also wrote, “This far the country does…

Removal – Day 27

November 1, 1846 Arrival at Westport Landing On this day, Myaamiaki on the steamboat Clermont No. 2 arrived at the Westport Landing, also known as the Kanza Landing, in the Town of Kansas, now known as Kansas City, Missouri. As sad and sick as Myaamiaki were, they must have been glad to get off the…