Removal – Day 18

October 23, 1846 Leaving Bloody Island Content Warning: This post discusses the death of a child and an adult After Myaamiaki had spent three days on Bloody Island, mourning their dead – the Waawiyaasita infant and the elder man named Ottawa, the Removal contractors procured the steamboat Clermont No. 2 to take them west on…

Removal – Day 17

October 22, 1846 Bloody Island Myaamiaki were still on Bloody Island another day. What were they doing today? Most likely, they were mourning, sitting, and waiting. In the next installment, to be posted on October 23, we will discover how Myaamiaki are taken from Bloody Island. Post written by Diane Hunter, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer…

Removal – Day 16

October 21, 1846 Bloody Island Myaamiaki were still on Bloody Island this day. The next leg of their journey was on the Peekamiiki Siipiiwi ‘Missouri River,’ which would take them to the eastern border of the Indian Territory west of Missouri. This river is very shallow and known for its many shipwrecks. The steamboat Colorado,…

Removal – Day 15

October 20, 1846 Bloody Island Content Warning: This post discusses the death of a child and an adult. Two days after the death of the infant from Waawiyaasita’s band, a Myaamia elder, a man named Ottawa, also died. Later that same day, the steamboat Colorado arrived outside of St. Louis. Myaamiaki deboarded at a place…

Removal – Day 13

October 18, 1846 The First Death Content Warning: This post discusses the death of a child. Despite Removal Agent Joseph Sinclair’s earlier report that those who had been sick were recovering, today on the Mihsi-Siipiiwi ‘Mississippi River,’ Myaamiaki aboard the steamboat Colorado experienced the first death of the journey, a piloohsa ‘infant’ from Waawiyaasita’s band….

Removal – Day 9

October 14, 1846 The Kaanseenseepiiwi ‘Ohio River’ On the third day of the journey on the Ohio River, Myaamiaki on the steamboat Colorado passed what has come to be known as Angel Mounds, a group of structures built from soil. Angel Mounds was built and occupied by people of the Mississippian culture between 1000 and…

Removal – Day 8

October 13, 1846The Kaanseenseepiiwi ‘Ohio River Yesterday, the steamboat Colorado departed Cincinnati with more than 300 Myaamiaki, the Removal Agent, the Removal contractors, traders, and possibly soldiers. Trader William Ewing wrote to Commissioner of Indian Affairs William Medill from Cincinnati that the Miami Nation left Cincinnati yesterday. He noted that those who had been sick…

Removal – Day 7

October 12, 1846 Cincinnati, Ohio Content Warning: This post discusses how Myaamia people were discussed by the residents of Cincinnati and the local newspaper. This morning, Myaamiaki disembarked from the canal boats. Many were still sick but probably glad to get off the boats. The Cincinnati newspapers reported that as Myaamiaki marched down Main Street,…

Removal – Day 6

October 11, 1846 Arrival in Cincinnati Content Warning: This post discusses specific names of Myaamia people impacted by Removal. It is possible that you may have a personal connection with some of those individuals. During this sixth day on the canal boats, Myaamiaki passed through Middletown and then Hamilton, Ohio. They could not see Miami…

Miami Tribe and Miami University: Our Connected Histories

In this year, the 175th anniversary of the removal of the Miami Tribe from our homelands, the Myaamia community is coming together to remember this history as a way to connect to our ancestors, to keep them close to us, and to maintain our relationship with them and their past.  However, this is not solely…