Mihšihkinaahkwa – A Brief Biography of ‘Little Turtle’

Akima Mihšihkinaahkwa ‘Chief Little Turtle’ (~1747-1812) was a prominent Myaamia leader from 1780 until 1809. Not much is known about his childhood. Little is known about his parents, but he did share one parent in common with the Myaamia leaders Pakaana and Tahkamwa. It is likely that he grew up in the area between the…

What's New with Aacimotaatiiyankwi?

We are excited about these changes and look forward to sharing with you! Home Page If you haven’t already noticed, we have completely changed the look of Aacimotaatiiyankwi: A Myaamia Community Blog this week! Instead of a list of all of our latest blog posts, you’ll now see a featured content slider where we’ll be…

Blog Maintenance Occurring the Week of December 16, 2019

Aacimotaatiiyankwi has undergone some changes over the last several years. We’ve added new contributors and webpages as well as reorganized some of our existing posts and pages. Since we’re growing and changing, we believe it’s time for our look to get an update too! Over the course of this week, we will be making updates…

waapankiaakamionki eehpyaaciki ‘They Arrived in Kansas’

On November 2, 1846, the first grouping of Myaamia people arrived on their new reservation in the Unorganized Indian Territory. They were unloaded at Kanza landing, in what is today Kansas City, Missouri, and then traveled the final 50-60 miles south via horse and wagon. By November 5, after nearly a month of travel, the…

meehkweelimankwiki myaamiaki aancihseeciki

We Remember the Myaamia Forced Removal aya eeweemilakakoki ‘Hello my relatives,’ 173 years ago this week, the United States government began the forced removal of Myaamia people from our historic homelands in the Wabash River Valley. On October 6, 1846, Myaamia people boarded canal boats near Iihkipihsinonki ‘the Straight Place’ (Peru, Indiana) and on the…